Wednesday, September 14, 2011

How do I disconnect the main power from the house in order to change the main breaker?

I had a breaker go bad, we changed it in the fuse box, but then the main breaker went bad, now we have to replace that but we neeed to know the step by step instructions on making sure we turn the power offfrom outside the home to the breaker box so we dont get fried...lol actually my step dad is a contractor and has changed main breakers before but isnt sure about how to turn off the power totally to the property box.How do I disconnect the main power from the house in order to change the main breaker?Call the electric company and request them to shut it off. If you remove the meter without permission, you can be charged for %26quot;theft of service%26quot;.How do I disconnect the main power from the house in order to change the main breaker?You do not need to turn off the power to remove and replace a breaker. Breakers just clip in. Of course you need to be careful, but this is a simple project.How do I disconnect the main power from the house in order to change the main breaker?Take out a permit for the work, then remove the meter from the meter base, do the R/R and call for the inspection and have the meter resealed.How do I disconnect the main power from the house in order to change the main breaker?Don't screw with it call your utility company. Have all the parts ready and they might come in and change the breaker for you.How do I disconnect the main power from the house in order to change the main breaker?The Power company will have to come out and disconnect it from the pole.How do I disconnect the main power from the house in order to change the main breaker?Call the power company and have them shut it off for you. Note that they may take a while to do this. And, they may take a while to turn it back on.



I had a problem once where a terminal to the part where the meter plugs in was loose and arcing (intermittent power loss to half the house). I called the power company (SDG%26amp;E) and they said it was my responsibility to fix it (it wasn't considered part of their system, even though it was a bad terminal to the meter itself). And, it would take a couple days to get out there to disconnect the power to the terminal blocks at the demarcation point. This was because they had to send out a planning engineer to inspect the damage first and it would take a couple days.



Then, after the repairs were done, I would have to call them out to reconnect the power and that would take a couple more days. So, SDG%26amp;E was going to leave me without power for at least four days, including possibly two more over a weekend, because of some bureaucratic BS.



So, I just undid the power lines from the terminal blocks myself (I was an an electrical operator on a submarine years ago, so I had experience with working on live 450-volt panels and circuits). When the repairs were done, I then installed new terminal blocks (the old ones were corroded) and wrapped them up with insulating tape.



Of course, I won't recommend you doing this if you aren't experienced with handling live power lines. But, SDG%26amp;E basically gave me no choice.

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